3 Sandwich Recipes for Every Lunch

Are you looking for a quick sandwich fix? Never fear, I have a few delicious tried-and-true  Martha Stewart sandwich recipes that are fast and easy for those on the run for lunchtime treats!  Great to pack for mid-day picnics (or on the workdesk) or little-prep for unexpected guests, these sandwiches are for every occasion. I can never let Martha go, I’m afraid, so let me at least share my discoveries with you!

Pressed Mozzarella and Tomato Sandwich
Mozzarella Sandwich

No panini press needed! A little lengthy in preparation. Make in the morning for a great picnic!

  • 2 tblsp Dijon mustard
  • 1/2 c. sun dried tomatoes, reserving 1 tblsp oil
  • 1/2 loaf ciabatta bread, split horizontally and hollowed out
  • Romaine lettuce leaves
  • 6 oz. fresh mozzarella, sliced
  • 1/2 cup fresh parsley
  • coarse salt and ground pepper
  1. In a small bowl, whisk together mustard and oil until thick. Spread on bread.
  2. Layer bottom half of bread with some of the lettuce, then cheese, tomatoes, and parsley. Season with salt and pepper. Top with remaining lettuce and bread.
  3. Wrap sandwich tightly in plastic and place on a baking sheet. Top with another baking sheet and weigh down with canned goods.
  4. Refrigerate at least 1 hour or up to overnight to meld flavours. Cut in half, serve.

Chicken and Marinated-Zucchini Sandwich
Zucchini Sandwich

Less time intensive, but still needing to marinate. Tasty and unusual! I adored the chordette.

  • 1 zucchini/chordette
  • 1/4 red onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 tblsp lemon zest
  • 2 tblsp fresh lemon juice
  • 2 tblsp olive oil
  • Salt and pepper
  • 1 lb chicken cutlets
  • Handful of chopped toasted almonds
  • Handful of fresh parsley
  • 1 loaf Italian bread
  • Romaine lettuce
  1. Slice the zucchini/chordette into ribbons with a vegetable peeler. Combine with the red onion, lemon zest, and lemon juice, with olive oil. Season with salt and pepper and let stand 30 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, season 1 lb chicken cutlets with salt and pepper and broil until cooked through. Let cool, then shred and add marinated zucchini along with almonds and parsley.
  3. Cut 1 loaf Italian bread in half horizontally and hollow out. Make a sandwich.

Ham, Brie, and Apple Triple Decker Sandwich
Ham Brie and Apple SandwichThe quickest sandwich I can offer you! Delicious as always!

  • Brie cheese, sliced
  • Tart apple, sliced
  • 3 slices pumpernickel bread
  • Ham, thinly sliced
  • Fruit chutney
  1. Layer cheese and apple onto 1 slice toasted bread. Top with another toasted slice, then ham. Spread chutney on a third toasted slice and place on top. Enjoy!

-A.

Recipes and Photographs Courtesy Of:

http://www.marthastewart.com/315629/pressed-mozzarella-and-tomato-sandwich

http://www.marthastewart.com/317575/chicken-and-marinated-zucchini-sandwich

http://www.marthastewart.com/342378/ham-brie-and-apple-triple-decker-sandwic

Wagamama Inspired Chicken Noodle Soup

I have done some researching online and it was simply disappointing. This is another one of my die-for recipes, a grandchild of Wagamama’s Chicken Ramen, which I call Asian-Inspired Chicken Noodle Soup. So you can combine the names however you’d like, just know that I’m not affiliated officially with Wagamama and if you don’t like it, that’s not my problem. But I’m not quite sure how you couldn’t like it, because it is damn good soup. As in, you will never go back to normal chicken soup again, even when your sinuses drip is making your stomach flop!

Asian Chicken Noodle Soup

Wagamama Inspired Asian Chicken Noodle Soup

  • 4 packages ramen noodles with spice packets
  • Chicken broth, egregious amounts
  • 8 tsp soy sauce
  • 9 tsp sake
  • 8 tsp mirin (a ricewine vinegar)
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • 3 chicken breasts
  • fresh spinach or seasonal greens
  • 2 spring onions finely chopped
  • 1/4 cup peanuts, chopped
  1. Mix the soy sauce, sake, mirin, and sugar , then coat the chicken and marinate for at least 2 hours.
  2. Grill or sear the chicken breast until it is firm, brushing frequently with the sauce while cooking.
  3. Steam the spinach.
  4. Boil the noodles.
  5. Heat the broth, add 1 tblsp of soy, sake, and mirin.
  6. Arrange cooked noodles in the bowl. Slice the chicken and pour in broth. Add greens, then garnish with peanuts and spring onions.

Asian Chicken Soup Wagamama Chicken Ramen

This is the specific “Wagamama Ramen” that Wagamama differentiates from average chicken ramen in its book “The Way of the Noodle.” (The above chicken soup recipe was altered from one from this book as well. You do the same steps, but it includes more seafood, so I’ll just leave you with the toppings so that you can alter the original recipe if you’d like.

  • Half of a boiled egg.
  • Spinach
  • Naruto Fishcake
  • Prawn
  • Teriyaki chicken
  • Crabstick
  • Deep fried tofu
  • Menma
  • Reconstituted wakame

Enjoy!

-A.

Photos Courtesy of:

¡Arriba Arriba! ‘A’ Guest Blogs Mexican-American Style!

Alert Alert! I’ve guest blogged on a lovely fellow foodie blog with a post about all I’ve learnt in terms of Mexican-American leftover cooking! So… surprise! Not only do you get to hear about C’s lovely (is that the proper term?) articulated chicken, you can now cook yourself up some chicken in quesadillas with a side of guacamole! Since this is a guest post, we’re not counting it as a regular post here on the blog.

http://leannecookingforthefamily.wordpress.com/2012/03/27/delicious-and-easy-to-make-quesadillas-and-guacamole/

Check out the link!

Quesadillas

Picture Courtesy of: http://mexicanfoodrecipes.us/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/Crab-Quesadillas1.jpg

What Do Single Girls Do Over the Weekend? Why, Articulate Chickens, of Course!

Since Easter is fast approaching, what better time to talk about chickens?!?! I thought I would share with you my latest adventure (in regards to chicken)…

A few weeks ago, I decided to set out on the quest of articulating the skeleton on an animal. I came to the conclusion that a chicken would be my best option. It would be easy to find one, they couldn’t have that many bones, and it would be small enough that I could easily assemble it. All three of these assumptions were wrong, but out of it I got my darling chicken, Fitzwilliam.

FIRST STEP: Let’s talk about the splendid experience of finding a chicken. I assumed that when chickens arrive at the supermarket, they are all intact. The butcher gets rid of the neck and legs and freshly puts them on display. This is not so. Apparently chickens do NOT arrive with these parts.

My first stop was ACME. Now, they do not have the best butchery department, but hey, they must have CHICKENS for god’s sake. Here’s how my conversation with the butcher went:

Butcher: “Hi there! How can I help you?”

ME: “I’m looking for a chicken. Would you happen to have one?”

Butcher: “Why, yes! They’re right over there”

ME: “No, I’m sorry. I meant, do you have any chickens with, you know…the head and feet still                                   attached?”

Butcher: “HAHAHAHAH!!! What, are you doing some type of satanic sacrifice? No, we don’t                                       carry them here. You’ll have to look around for one of them…”

And he was quite right. I was going to have to look around. I decided then that I was going to call places before running around like a chicken without a head (hehehe). I called so many butchers, grocery stores, and markets, but to no avail. I either got laughed at or hung up on. I guess that my request wasn’t the norm…FINALLY on a whim I decided that I would go out to the Asian Market as a final desperate chance.

I walked up to the butcher here and had basically the same conversation as previously depicted, but instead of the butcher laughing at me, he just walked away and went into the back. I didn’t know what to do so I just waited for about a minute. Then he finally came out with Fitzwilliam. My Chicken.

I glowed as I walked up to the cash-register.  Finally, It would be easy sailing from here. WRONG.

SECOND STEP: Getting the bones. I knew that I was going to have to boil the chicken because I didn’t have a colony of flesh eating bugs on hand. So, I got to experience the wonderful smell of over-boiled chicken!

THIRD STEP: Clean the bones. It was relatively late at night when I started to separate the meat from the bones and remove the cartilage. Little did I know that it would take a few hours for this process alone.

FOURTH STEP: Bleach the bones. As I finished cleaning each bone, I placed it into a bath of hydrogen peroxide. Once all of them were in, I added bleach. Apparently, when you mix hydrogen peroxide and bleach, you get a white foam…

FIFTH STEP: Clean them again…because anything left on the bones will now come off easier. Then rinse.

SIXTH STEP:  Articulate. Much easier said than done. No matter how many pictures you look at, nothing seems to fit together. In the end, I took artistic liberties and created Fitzwiliam.

He may not have ribs or feet, or even be atomically correct, but I adore him. His journey was one of adventure: from the back room of an Asian Food Market to my office shelf. Maybe one day I will be able to make him a proper sibling, but until then, he’s perfect. <3

-C