Olde Timey Insults

Is it that English just doesn’t have the words to describe that heinous, foul-souled beast who works in the cubicle next to you? Or perhaps, that you just can’t find the word that truly encompasses the terribly horrible nature of the woman down the street? Well, look no further, because it could be that you now know exactly what to call your nephew the next time you see him — and English may actually have the word to describe it! Let’s take a hop and a skip back in history to some Olde Timey Insults. These are taken from Forgotten English III’s Long Lost Insults by Knowledge Cards. They’re taken from old dictionaries, and, naturally, I don’t claim to hold the copywright on any of them.

Nyargle:

A foolish person fond of disrupting. –John Mactaggart, Scottish Gallovidian Encyclopaedia, 1824.

Munz-Watcher:

One of those sneaks that makes a practice of wtching the movements, etc, of sweethearts on their nightly walks, and if any impropriety is witnessed, demanding hush-money to keep the matter secret. -Joseph Wright, English Dialect Dictionary, 1896-1905.

Hogs-Norton:

This proverbial phrase was commonly addressed to any clownish fellow, unacquainted with the rules of good society. –James Halliwell, Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words, 1855.

Pilgarlick:

A poor, ill dressed person; an object of pity or contempt. –Sidney Addy, Sheffield Glossary of Words, 1888.

Spatherdab:

A chatterer, gossip, scandal-monger; a woman who goes from house to house dispensing news. –A. Benoni Evans, Leicestershire Words, Phrases, and Proverbs, 1881.

1800s Engraving

Gongoozler:

An idle and inquisitive person who stands staring for prolonged periods at anything out of the common. –Joseph Wright, English Dialect Dictionary, 1896-1905.

Zounderkite:

Usually applied to one whose stupid conduct results in awkward mistakes. –C. Clough Robinson, Dialect of Mid-Yorkshire, 1876.

Flotch:

A big, fat, dirty person; applied chiefly to women, and implying tawdriness and ungracefulness. –John Jamieson, Etymological Dictionary of the Scottish Language, 1808.

Mammothrept:

A spoilt child. –Thomas Wright, Dictionary of Obsolete and Provincial English, 1857.

Fustilugs:

An ill-natured person. –C. Clough Robinson, Glossary of Mid-Yorkshire, 1876.

-A.

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Kehinde Wiley: Tradition Takes a Modern Form

Kehinde Wiley

So you all know that we, over here on Taxidermy and the 20th Century, love things oldey-timey. But we don’t just love the unusal ancient things and spend all of our time poring over old books and old things and old stuff. Sometimes, we like to see how the ancient and the traditional merges with the modern, and that’s how I give you Kehinde Wiley. Wiley likes the same things that we do here at Taxi20: the old and the new. However, he takes it a step further. He gives people of black heritage, specifically those with an African American culture, the same sort of traditional paintings that white people have had throughout their history.

Kehinde Wiley

I mean, anyone who has studied Art History or European History (or perhaps even World History) can recognise the painting to my left. It’s Napoleon crossing the Alps to lead his French soldiers into battle against the other empires of Europe. It’s a painting that clamours of glory and pride, and Kehinde Wiley repaints it with a major change; we see that a camo-donned African American has taken the place of Napoleon.

Suddenly, Kehinde Wiley has placed a member of his own race as the leader of national pride and liberty. By mixing these two different ideas of black culture and classical portraiture, Wiley brings the gift of classical pride to blacks. He’s shouting that his culture and heritage is something to be proud of!

Kehinde Wiley

Wiley doesn’t just paint African Americans, though. He paints also Afro-Brazilians, Ethiopian Jews, and a whole slew of other varieties of people with black heritage. We live in a modern world that is both teeming with racism and adamant that the issue is one of the past, not of today. But as retroverts and antiquophiles (two new words I have made up), the bloggers here at Taxi20 can tell you that the past and the present are deeply intertwined. It’s motions like this, where black culture is given the same pride and status as classical white culture, that help to blur the boundaries that exist in society today.

-A.

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Music for a Classical Atmosphere

Hello everyone! Sorry that this is a day late; the system seemed to think we had compromising material on our blog and shut down our posting abilities until we could be reviewed by staff. I hope this lives up to how much you missed out!

Ok, so this is the first time I’ve ever tried to do this. I’m going to talk to you about music, something I will not even pretend to be an expert about! So, for all of you music buffs, this isn’t a classical playlist as much as it is music with a classical feel. Music that brings you back to the 1300s, the 1700s, etc. I was jumping between writing about the best of the 1920s-1940s and this, but I think that this might bring to light some interesting groups you didn’t think of! So turn your scopes back pretty far, retroverts, because we’re taking a jump into the real past.

Francisco de la Torre

Francisco de la Torre
You can find pieces of Francisco de la Torre on Youtube, thankfully, and if you want to jump back to real Spanish mediaeval music, this fellow is the way to go. He’s a mediaeval composer who was most likely from Sevilla. His work has a jumpy, lilting feel that is very typical of mediaeval tunes. Check out a few of these videos:

Mediaeval Baebes

These ladies have been a favourite of mine for several years, and are a staple of the ancient-loving in music. You can find their website online, where they have a few samples of songs. I don’t recall if you can buy them on iTunes (I ripped their CDs onto my iTunes), but it’s certainly worth a try. They sing in Middle English, Latin, Italian, and I believe, at times, in modern English as well.
Mediaeval Baebes

Some of my favourites of theirs include:

  • Gaudete
  • Ecce Munde Gaudium
  • Return of the Birds
  • Undrentide
  • Cittern Segue
  • Scarborough Fayre

They have a lovely authentic sound and their songs are of fantastic quality. I can safely say that I’ve been listening to their songs for as long as I can remember, really, and they never get old. Though, I do wish they’d change their name; it’s a bit embarrassing to refer someone to “baebes,” especially someone academic.

The Waverly Consort
I actually had no idea that this group was online until I sat down and wrote this. They also have a website where you can purchase some of their CDs, but I have to say, my favourite wasn’t there.

Mappa Mundi
What you’re listening to is a song called Mappa Mundi from the Waverly Consort’s CD 1492: Music from the Age of Discovery. This copy in my hand is from 1992. I can, through sheer repetition, sing along to the mediaeval Italian because it was such an integral part of my childhood. There is something pure and enchanting about their works, especially the ones from this CD. If you enjoy the Youtube video, be sure to check them out and consider purchasing more of their work.

Broadside Band

I don’t know if you can get these very easily, since my CD is from 1991 and the only song I found on Youtube, I’m not even sure if it’s by them, but they are one of my favourites. I enjoy their folk approach t classical music, and I have spent many (semi-sophistocated) afternoons listening to their CD English Country Dances, definitely what you need for a hop and a skip into real-life Pride and Prejudice!

Loreena McKennitt

A modern artist, Loreena blends mediaeval, Middle Eastern, fantastic, and some modern elements into her pieces. They evoke images of Middle Earth and other fantasy worlds to me, and I always throw in a song or two by her whenever I put together a playlist of classical-atmospheric music. After all, since none of this is actually in the genre of classical music, why not add a mysterious element to it?

The Mask and the Mirror Loreena McKennit

Find her website here: http://www.quinlanroad.com/homepage/index.asp?LangType=1033 and consider purchasing her works either in CD form or on iTunes so that you can add this exotic twist to your library!

Jean Yves Thibaudet

A few of you savvy Austen-ites may recognise this name, or perhaps just those familiar with film music. Jean Yves Thibaudet composed the music for the latest Pride and Prejudice film. These songs, while short and soft, add a quick moment of romantic dreaminess to your playlist. Take a hop back to the 1700s, with a more conventional feel, by trying out a few of these for your latest craze.

The Chieftains

Irish Pub Painting

And now we turn to the timeless. I cannot reccomend these fellows enough to you, and I beg you to invest in music that they’ve done by themselves, without featuring other artists, because I enjoy that the best. I’ve included their Christmas album into my classical-atmosphere playlists for the sort of music that makes you want to hop up and do a jig! Visit their website here: http://www.thechieftains.com/ and think about bringing more bagpipes and accordions into your life! Thankfully, they sample more pieces on their website, so you can get a better taste of them. Here’s to the best  playlist composing!

-A.

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