Tooth Jewelry

Two of my biggest obsessions in life are jewelry and the slightly macabre. I’ve seen many pieces of taxidermy and bone jewelry, but my absolute favorite has to be human tooth jewelry. There is just something even more creepy about wearing human bone…maybe even more in that it’s a bone we see every day.

The fact that we do see teeth everyday lends itself to become somewhat boring. It is ashame because teeth are probably some of the most ornate bones we have…which begs the question, why not make them into jewelry?!?

I’ve seen pieces tastefully done, and others not so tastefully (no pun intended)…i guess a lot of it lies in the final presentation. Simply stringing a tooth can look to “sharktooth-ish” or it might have the perfect simplistic look. It’s tryly touch and run.

Nonetheless, tooth jewelry is absolutely wonderful and can be worn anytime. It reminds me of ivory in its color and texture (probably because they’re both bone =P). Anyhow, you should try this trend…we all already are rocking it in some way ;)

-C

Pics:

http://www.thefrisky.com/2011-07-23/do-not-want-a-ring-you-can-sink-your-teeth-into/

http://www.tribalmania.com/FIJIANTOOTHNECKLACE.htm

http://lovelydeadandgone.tumblr.com/page/4

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William Bishop Ford

A common form of art in the 16th-19th century was portrait miniatures. Women would keep them of their husbands who were in the army or away and men would carry ones to remind them of their families. Another popular use was to celebrate the life of a deceased loved one.

Because of the enormous sentimental value and personal attachment to portrait miniatures I was determined to find myself one. Even though I cannot express how much I adore these tiny masterpieces, I was a bit nervous about acquiring one. For the same reasons I love them (their personal value), I also feel that it is difficult to possess something that meant so much to someone.

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It took me about a year to find the perfect one, but eventually I did. The one I found was of three whippets. Perfect, I thought, because animals have a very close connection with their owners, but it is not like I am carrying someone’s husband around on my collar.

(this one’s mine!! =D)

When I first purchased my portrait miniature, I was unaware of who had painted it or how old it was. The back on it had been replaced at some point in time (probably very early 20th century), and was sealed. Being too afraid to remove the backing, for fear of damaging the piece, I decided to research it solely on its technique, medium, and subject.

I was genuinely shocked when I found who I was definite is the artist. I never expected to be able to come up with a definite answer, but there is no doubt about it…my miniature was painted by William Bishop Ford.

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Ford was a British artist who lived between the years of 1832 and 1922. He was a specialist painter of miniature enamels. He apprenticed under William Essex (who perfected the technique of reverse essex glass painting, which is how mine if done). His subjects included many animals as well as people, and the framing used is unmistakable.

This piece has become one of my most prized possessions. I feel such a personal connection to it and am proud to wear it frequently.

-C

Photo Credits:

The Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery & my collection