Regret

My post today is going to be a bit more personal than what A and I normally post, but it should be nonetheless interesting (because, let’s face it, we all enjoy glimpses into personal unrest). I’m not really sure if this is a public apology or just a venting session, but regardless, it is a sentiment of regret.

Regret is an emotion that is probably one of the most common – whether we want to admit it or not. We always wonder what we could have done differently in any situation or whether we could change some outcome. Scientifically, regret is actually linked to the orbitofrontal cortex…making it an actual physical phenomenon.

More often than not, regret will lead to guilt. This guilt can be expressed in sadness, shame, embarrassment, sorrow, and remorse.

Personal actions committed of wrongdoing render an unconditional eating of the soul. Nothing is more painful – I would rather saw off my own arm. The worst of any type of regret is when you are unsure of what you regret; knowing only that there was some wrongdoing. Another is knowing you have wronged someone, you know they know, but you both ignore it. And finally, where you both know and are open to it …probably the easiest but no less painful.

So to the people this is specifically meant for (and there are quite a few of you) know I am so sorry for how I have wronged you. All I can do is wish and pray for your forgiveness. For everyone else, take this as a lesson. Always be the best you can be so that you can live without the burden of regret and guilt.

-C

PS: On a happier note, this week A gave me a brilliant idea for a future post on hat-making! This will take me a few weeks to work on so that I can craft a few examples, but it should be pretty spectacular and I am truly looking forward to getting to share it with you all!

Credits:

http://www.dreamstime.com/stock-images-stock-images-black-white-abstract-art-background-image12315234

http://kochis.net/wp/?tag=black-and-white

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William Bishop Ford

A common form of art in the 16th-19th century was portrait miniatures. Women would keep them of their husbands who were in the army or away and men would carry ones to remind them of their families. Another popular use was to celebrate the life of a deceased loved one.

Because of the enormous sentimental value and personal attachment to portrait miniatures I was determined to find myself one. Even though I cannot express how much I adore these tiny masterpieces, I was a bit nervous about acquiring one. For the same reasons I love them (their personal value), I also feel that it is difficult to possess something that meant so much to someone.

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It took me about a year to find the perfect one, but eventually I did. The one I found was of three whippets. Perfect, I thought, because animals have a very close connection with their owners, but it is not like I am carrying someone’s husband around on my collar.

(this one’s mine!! =D)

When I first purchased my portrait miniature, I was unaware of who had painted it or how old it was. The back on it had been replaced at some point in time (probably very early 20th century), and was sealed. Being too afraid to remove the backing, for fear of damaging the piece, I decided to research it solely on its technique, medium, and subject.

I was genuinely shocked when I found who I was definite is the artist. I never expected to be able to come up with a definite answer, but there is no doubt about it…my miniature was painted by William Bishop Ford.

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Ford was a British artist who lived between the years of 1832 and 1922. He was a specialist painter of miniature enamels. He apprenticed under William Essex (who perfected the technique of reverse essex glass painting, which is how mine if done). His subjects included many animals as well as people, and the framing used is unmistakable.

This piece has become one of my most prized possessions. I feel such a personal connection to it and am proud to wear it frequently.

-C

Photo Credits:

The Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery & my collection