Olde Timey Insults

Is it that English just doesn’t have the words to describe that heinous, foul-souled beast who works in the cubicle next to you? Or perhaps, that you just can’t find the word that truly encompasses the terribly horrible nature of the woman down the street? Well, look no further, because it could be that you now know exactly what to call your nephew the next time you see him — and English may actually have the word to describe it! Let’s take a hop and a skip back in history to some Olde Timey Insults. These are taken from Forgotten English III’s Long Lost Insults by Knowledge Cards. They’re taken from old dictionaries, and, naturally, I don’t claim to hold the copywright on any of them.

Nyargle:

A foolish person fond of disrupting. –John Mactaggart, Scottish Gallovidian Encyclopaedia, 1824.

Munz-Watcher:

One of those sneaks that makes a practice of wtching the movements, etc, of sweethearts on their nightly walks, and if any impropriety is witnessed, demanding hush-money to keep the matter secret. -Joseph Wright, English Dialect Dictionary, 1896-1905.

Hogs-Norton:

This proverbial phrase was commonly addressed to any clownish fellow, unacquainted with the rules of good society. –James Halliwell, Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words, 1855.

Pilgarlick:

A poor, ill dressed person; an object of pity or contempt. –Sidney Addy, Sheffield Glossary of Words, 1888.

Spatherdab:

A chatterer, gossip, scandal-monger; a woman who goes from house to house dispensing news. –A. Benoni Evans, Leicestershire Words, Phrases, and Proverbs, 1881.

1800s Engraving

Gongoozler:

An idle and inquisitive person who stands staring for prolonged periods at anything out of the common. –Joseph Wright, English Dialect Dictionary, 1896-1905.

Zounderkite:

Usually applied to one whose stupid conduct results in awkward mistakes. –C. Clough Robinson, Dialect of Mid-Yorkshire, 1876.

Flotch:

A big, fat, dirty person; applied chiefly to women, and implying tawdriness and ungracefulness. –John Jamieson, Etymological Dictionary of the Scottish Language, 1808.

Mammothrept:

A spoilt child. –Thomas Wright, Dictionary of Obsolete and Provincial English, 1857.

Fustilugs:

An ill-natured person. –C. Clough Robinson, Glossary of Mid-Yorkshire, 1876.

-A.

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Kehinde Wiley: Tradition Takes a Modern Form

Kehinde Wiley

So you all know that we, over here on Taxidermy and the 20th Century, love things oldey-timey. But we don’t just love the unusal ancient things and spend all of our time poring over old books and old things and old stuff. Sometimes, we like to see how the ancient and the traditional merges with the modern, and that’s how I give you Kehinde Wiley. Wiley likes the same things that we do here at Taxi20: the old and the new. However, he takes it a step further. He gives people of black heritage, specifically those with an African American culture, the same sort of traditional paintings that white people have had throughout their history.

Kehinde Wiley

I mean, anyone who has studied Art History or European History (or perhaps even World History) can recognise the painting to my left. It’s Napoleon crossing the Alps to lead his French soldiers into battle against the other empires of Europe. It’s a painting that clamours of glory and pride, and Kehinde Wiley repaints it with a major change; we see that a camo-donned African American has taken the place of Napoleon.

Suddenly, Kehinde Wiley has placed a member of his own race as the leader of national pride and liberty. By mixing these two different ideas of black culture and classical portraiture, Wiley brings the gift of classical pride to blacks. He’s shouting that his culture and heritage is something to be proud of!

Kehinde Wiley

Wiley doesn’t just paint African Americans, though. He paints also Afro-Brazilians, Ethiopian Jews, and a whole slew of other varieties of people with black heritage. We live in a modern world that is both teeming with racism and adamant that the issue is one of the past, not of today. But as retroverts and antiquophiles (two new words I have made up), the bloggers here at Taxi20 can tell you that the past and the present are deeply intertwined. It’s motions like this, where black culture is given the same pride and status as classical white culture, that help to blur the boundaries that exist in society today.

-A.

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Garlic Scapes and Gooseberries!

For those of you looking for new ingredients to incorporate into your cooking this spring-into-summer, I’m going to turn back to the unusual classics of cuisine! Spring-into-summer is a great time to try new ingredients, pull out old ones in a new way, or reinvent that delicious dish from your childhood. Let’s take a peek at two delicious ingredients and ways that you can bring fresh fruits and vegetables into your life.

Garlic Scapes are an incredible part of this traditional vegetable that most people overlook. In fact, I was just put on their trail a few days ago, and now I can’t get enough! They’re the twirly, curly, green-onion-y growth of the garlic (that thing that starts to sprout if you let your garlic sit too long). Cut off long before garlic harvesting, these sprouts are actually a delicious ingredient that can be chopped up into pestos, sauces, and other dishes.

Garlic Scapes
So what’s the best way to use garlic scapes? From what I’ve heard and in my personal opinion, it’s by making a pesto. Thick on crackers, thin in soups, pesto is a delicious addition to any lunch or dinner. Throw a dollop into your slow-cooker or spread a layer on a boring sandwich for a garlic-y, basil-y depth that you weren’t expecting!

  • 10 Garlic Scapes
  • 1/3 cup nuts (such as pistachios or almonds)
  • 1/3-1/2 cup grated Parmesan
  • Salt and Pepper
  • 1/3-1/2 cup olive oil

Blend and mix for deliciousness that you won’t forget! You’ll never go back to ordinary garlic cloves after this!

And what would summer be without the traditional but oft o’erlooked Gooseberry? Even better, let’s throw these tart-sweet treats into a pie that will wow any of your neighbours! These fuzzy berries can be used when they are firm and tart or soft and sweet, so be conscious of what sort of gooseberries you’re picking to put in your pie, as you may want to add or remove sugar tending to their ripeness.

Gooseberry Pie
I’m going to take this recipe from AllRecipes, but I’ve altered it, so if you would like to look at the original, go here. So, let’s take a peek at this pie, shall we?

  • 3 cups gooseberries
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 2 and 1/2 tblsp quick-cooking tapioca
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • double crust pastry
  • 2 tblsp milk
  • 1 further tblsp sugar

Gooseberries

  1. Stem and rinse berries.
  2. Crush 1/2 cup berries in the bottom of a saucepan. Combine sugar, tapioca, and salt; mix with crushed berries. Cook and stir until mixture boils. Cook for 2-3 more minutes. Remove from heat, and add in remaining whole berries.
  3. Pour fruit filling into pastry. Adjust top crust , cut slits for escape of steam. Brush with milk and sugar.
  4. Bake at 400 degrees F (205 degrees C) for 40-45 minutes.

Good luck with your gooseberries and garlic scapes! Now you have two great recipes to try out and cook as the weather starts to get hot. Celebrate a ripe season with these great recipes and feel free to leave any comments about posts you’re interested in. We’d love to hear about what themes are your favourites and what you’d like us to write more about! Cheers!

-A.

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Recipes from the Finnish Kitchen

For those of you who are wondering “Where the hell is Finland?”, I can tell you that after you try these recipes, you won’t be wondering anymore! My family owned a bakery in Southern Finland, a nation lodged between the ‘charming’ neighbours of Sweden and Russia. It’s a quiet place, with lots of saunas, alcohol, coffee, and fish. I thought that I’d share these two delightful recipes with you from our family’s bakery, just recently sold, so that everyone can enjoy the unique deliciousness of Finnish delights!
Pulla Pitko

Pulla Pitko (Finnish Coffee Bread)

Pulla is a central part of the Finnish dining experience. And let me tell you, it’s called coffee bread for a reason. In Finland, you are served at least 3 cups of coffee in one sitting, and a 7-cup day is not unusual, especially in the sun-less winter days. Since this is an old family recipe, it’s, well, a little vague. My mother, a non-Finn, tried to specify everything a bit, but she still suggests using Finnish measuring cups. It’s definitely worth the hassle!

Bread

  • 1 and 1/2 eggs
  • 2 and 1/2 cups milk, room temperature
  • 1 and 1/2 tsp cardamom (5 ml size tsps)
  • 1 pckg dry yeast
  • 1 and 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 and 1/2 sticks melted butter
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 17 Dl flour

Toppings

  • 1 egg, beaten
  • Slivered almonds
  • Crushed sugar
  • Raisins (optional)

Pulla

  1. Mix all ingredients in a large bowl, adding the flour in last, until it forms a soft dough. Mix only with your hands. It will fail to stick once it is ready.
  2. Put the mixture in a greased bowl, turn once, then cover it with a towel and let it rise in a warm place until doubled. This will take about 1 hour.
  3. Punch down and knead a little to get the air bubbles out.
  4. Cover baking sheet with parchment paper, and prepare toppings.
  5. Cut the dough in half, then cut in half again. Roll each section into a rope, then braid. It should make 2 pitkot, or loaves.
  6. Brush with the egg and apply toppings.
  7. Let sit for 10-20 minutes while oven warms, then bake at 400 degrees Farenheit for 25 minutes. Do not overbake to avoid dry pulla.
  8. Serve with coffee.

Piparkakut

Hyvät Piparkakut (Finnish Pepper Cookies)

Crisp, spicy pepper cookies! Everyone’s favourite every time. You’ll never go back to ginger snaps again! Give them a try to bring exotic Scandinavian goodness to your next bake sale, because this makes 8 dozen!

  • 1 cup dark corn syrup
  • 2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp allspice
  • 1/4 tsp black pepper
  • 1 tsp cloves
  • 1 tsp ginger
  • 2 cups butter
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 4 tsp baking soda
  • 9 cups flour
  1. Preheat to 375 degrees Farenheit.
  2. Combine syrup, spices, butter, and sugar in a saucepan. Bring to a boil.
  3. Remove from heat and pour into a mixing bowl. Cool.
  4. Stir in egg, heavy cream, baking soda, and flour. Chill overnight.
  5. Roll out very thin, using about 1/2 cup dough at a time, and cut into various shapes.
  6. Place on a greased baking sheet. Bake at 375 Farenheit for 12-15 minutes, until cookies are crisp but not overly browned. Makes 8 dozen 2 inch cookies.

Piparkakut-A.

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Thomas Aquinas Daly

I don’t know if the Internet knows this yet, but I adore art.  Today, I’d to introduce you to one of my favourite artists, one that not that many people know: Thomas Aquinas Daly.
Thomas Aquinas DalyHe does watercolour and oil painting and plays with neutral tones to create an expressionistic atmosphere that brings about images of fog and cold water.  Born 2 years before the second world war, he was educated as a graphic artist at the University of Buffalo and has produced two books. I have (in my personal opinion) the best of the two, called Painting Nature’s Quiet Places.

Thomas Aquinas Daly

While I can’t find my personal favourites of his on the internet, I hope that these pictures give you an idea of what he paints, how he paints, and how you can alter your painting or artistic reviewing in order to accommodate some of his best elements.

He paints nature, elements of nature, and the atmosphere of the countryside in a way that makes us all feel those cold wet socks without having to go fox hunting without the light of the sun. And that, in my opinion, is true mastery; somehow, he also manages to make it beautiful. That damp fishing boat seems romantic, glorious, in a quiet, subtle way, and if anyone can make a dead fish look appealing, then he deserves my full attention and respect.

Thomas Aquinas Daly

Oh, and, then there’s the dead animals pinned to grey walls. That’s a little less glorious. But, hey, this is a blog with a central element of taxidermy, so I tilt my hat to you, C, and give everyone a little bit they can know about dead fish.

I want to turn back to his colour combinations and compositions, though. You may notice that I’ve selected a few images in which he truly offsets the centres of focus, and a few where they are almost in the centre of the page.

He balances muted tones with small pieces of rich colour. If you look to the wall-pinned-fish-painting to the right, you can see what I’m describing; the slate blue-grey of the wall has echoes of the brilliant cobalt and vermilion in the fish. This is how Daly gives us the foggy feeling of his paintings, by echoing the focus in the fog of the background.

Even though it’s subtler in the image below, we have the same theme; the soft olive and forest greens of the trees can be found in the shadow of the fisherman’s hat and in his trousers. The river is not a silly blue, but, instead, a murky, realistic green. The house, therefore, is what truly leaps out at us, but because it is balanced with the stripe of open sky and its reflection, it isn’t an obnoxious focal point.

Thomas Aquinas Daly

For those of you who want to pursue art but find it too mysterious and selective of a field, I’m here to tell you that it’s just as much architecture as it is talent. A huge hunk of talent comes from being able to learn the rules and play them to your advantage. Once you understand composition on a near-esoteric level and have a good grasp of art history, suddenly, modern art makes sense. Perhaps I’ll write a post like that: why modern art actually makes sense.

Thomas Aquinas Daly

I urge you to consider pursuing art and art history hand-in-hand rather than try to tackle one individually. You can never understand what you’re drawing until you see how others have struggled through it before you (it’s like reading novels before getting on the New York Times’ Best Selling list), and you can never look at art without having felt it.

It’s like what my own glorious art professor once told me: You can always tell who has ridden a horse and who hasn’t by the way that they draw it. Those who have ridden horses draw the rhythm of their bones behind the muscles of a gentle beast. Those who have not draw shadows of lifeless vehicles.

-A.

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Information from:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Aquinas_Daly

http://www.thomasaquinasdaly.com/index.html