Getting to Know the 1800’s Part I

Absquatulate: To take leave, to disappear.

I’m so sorry about that short hiatus, things have been so crazy. I’ve been dealing with several international bureaucracies, and I don’t even really have a moment right now. Hopefully, I’ll get back on a stable schedule and be able to post more regularly. In the mean time, I’m going to do a series of posts about Getting to Know the 1800s, taking excerpts from Everyday Life in the 1800s by Marc McCutcheon. Perhaps it will entertain some of you, especially those of you who enjoyed the Olde Timey Insults! Funny what quaint slang they had back then, isn’t it?

Gotham: New York City.

You just thought it was from the Batman (admittedly, I accidentally wrote Bathman at first) comics, didn’t you? Well, actually, this name has been referring to the Big Apple throughout the early 1800s. McCutcheon cites a less-than-flattering description of New York City as Gotham:

“An Albany or Newark dog is well worth fifty cents, if brought to Gotham’s authorities, as if actually killed in Gotham’s streets… We understand that a dog’s flesh is quite a luxury in Gotham market.” Philadelphia Public Ledger, 5 August 1836.

Gotham City

Pigs: Kept as pets and as future food sources in yards, towns, and cities all over America. Thousands of them ran freely on New York City streets during the first half of the century.

Queen Anne House: A house style popular in the 1870s and 1880s in England and America, actually based on a combination of Elizabethan, Tudor, Gothic, and English Renaissance forms. Notable features included polygonal or cylindrical towers, bay windows, balconies, and ornate woodwork.

Queen Anne House

Groom’s Seat: A small seat or rumble seat where a groom or footman rode at the back of a coach or carraige.

Dugway: Popular slang for a simple, dug-out road.

George IV Phaeton: An elegant, slipper-shaped carriage with folding hood, pulled by two horses. This vehicle was very popular with women because it was graceful and was open to allow the passengers’ fashion to be seen and admired from the street.

George IV Phaeton

-A.

Photos Courtesy Of:
http://www.rina2012.co.uk/communities/2/004/005/953/492/images/4514693977.jpg

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Olde Timey Insults

Is it that English just doesn’t have the words to describe that heinous, foul-souled beast who works in the cubicle next to you? Or perhaps, that you just can’t find the word that truly encompasses the terribly horrible nature of the woman down the street? Well, look no further, because it could be that you now know exactly what to call your nephew the next time you see him — and English may actually have the word to describe it! Let’s take a hop and a skip back in history to some Olde Timey Insults. These are taken from Forgotten English III’s Long Lost Insults by Knowledge Cards. They’re taken from old dictionaries, and, naturally, I don’t claim to hold the copywright on any of them.

Nyargle:

A foolish person fond of disrupting. –John Mactaggart, Scottish Gallovidian Encyclopaedia, 1824.

Munz-Watcher:

One of those sneaks that makes a practice of wtching the movements, etc, of sweethearts on their nightly walks, and if any impropriety is witnessed, demanding hush-money to keep the matter secret. -Joseph Wright, English Dialect Dictionary, 1896-1905.

Hogs-Norton:

This proverbial phrase was commonly addressed to any clownish fellow, unacquainted with the rules of good society. –James Halliwell, Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words, 1855.

Pilgarlick:

A poor, ill dressed person; an object of pity or contempt. –Sidney Addy, Sheffield Glossary of Words, 1888.

Spatherdab:

A chatterer, gossip, scandal-monger; a woman who goes from house to house dispensing news. –A. Benoni Evans, Leicestershire Words, Phrases, and Proverbs, 1881.

1800s Engraving

Gongoozler:

An idle and inquisitive person who stands staring for prolonged periods at anything out of the common. –Joseph Wright, English Dialect Dictionary, 1896-1905.

Zounderkite:

Usually applied to one whose stupid conduct results in awkward mistakes. –C. Clough Robinson, Dialect of Mid-Yorkshire, 1876.

Flotch:

A big, fat, dirty person; applied chiefly to women, and implying tawdriness and ungracefulness. –John Jamieson, Etymological Dictionary of the Scottish Language, 1808.

Mammothrept:

A spoilt child. –Thomas Wright, Dictionary of Obsolete and Provincial English, 1857.

Fustilugs:

An ill-natured person. –C. Clough Robinson, Glossary of Mid-Yorkshire, 1876.

-A.

Photos Courtesy Of:

Tattoo Mania!

I have always had a strange fascination with tattoos. I can guarantee myself that I would never have the nerve to get one, but I do adore many that I have seen. Here are a few of my favorites that I have spotted online (some I love for their beauty and others solely for their originality)…

I’m sorry I couldn’t post more! This week has been super busy preparing for exams….my post on tuesday probably will be pretty short too…but I promise a super duper post for next Saturday!!!!

-C

Sources:

http://www.dollymix.tv/2008/10/picture_question_would_you_get.html

http://peas-and-love.blogspot.com/2010/03/tattooooos.html

http://www.flickriver.com/photos/outsapop/5131568398/

Walter Potter’s Whimsical World

A few weeks ago, I posted about rogue taxidermy and featured a photograph of kittens having tea (Kittens Having Tea and Squirrels Dueling). Recently, from some random internet browsing, I discovered who created this piece. It is actually much older than I expected and is not the only unusual piece that this artist created…

Walter Potter started to experiment with taxidermy in 1854 (at the age of 19). Although his profession was traditional taxidermy, he is famous for his anthropomorphic dioramas. These were displayed in his family’s pub, The White Lion.

Some of my favorites:

The Rabbits’ Village School – 1888

Features 48 rabbits performing multiple tasks from math to sewing.

The Upper Ten or Squirrels Club – unknown date

18 European Red Squirrels in a gentlemen’s club.

The Lower Five or Rats Den – unknown date

Companion to The Upper Ten. Made up of 15 Brown Rats in a much more rambunctious setting than the squirrels.

The Kitten Wedding – 1890’s

Potter’s only display with clothed animals.

After the Victorian Era, however, interest in taxidermy wavered. Unfortunately, in 2003 the collection was broken up in an auction. All together, the collection (consisting of 13 pieces) sold for £97,700. It is such a pity that the pieces could not stay together.

A very happy Easter or Passover to everyone!!! =)

-C

Many thanks for the pictures:

http://www.acaseofcuriosities.com/pages/01_2_00potter.html